Using the Silent Sleep

The Silent Sleep™ Educational Videos

The Silent Sleep™ Educational Video

Silent Sleep Appliance

Doctor Demonstration

  The Silent Sleep™ Educational Video

Oral Appliances and Sleep Apnea

Doctor Demonstration

 
The Silent Sleep™ Educational Video

Fitting the Silent Sleep

Doctor Demonstration

  The Silent Sleep™ Educational Video

Silent Sleep as a Bruxism Guard

Doctor Demonstration

 
The Silent Sleep™ Educational Video

How to Reline the Silent Sleep

For Better Retention

  The Silent Sleep™ Educational Video

The Silent Sleep Position

Bite Registration for a Custom Appliance

 
The Silent Sleep™ Educational Video

Using Silent Sleep Bite Gauges

Doctor/Patient Demonstration

  The Silent Sleep™ Educational Video

Fitting the Silent Sleep over Tori

Doctor/Patient Demonstration

 
The Silent Sleep™ Educational Video

Jaw Clicking

Doctor Demonstration

  The Silent Sleep™ Educational Video

CPAP Pro

Doctor Demonstration

 
The Silent Sleep™ Educational Video

Moses Appliance

Doctor Demonstration

  The Silent Sleep™ Educational Video

EMA Appliance

Doctor Demonstration

 

Silent Sleep Podcasts

Listen to learn more about the Silent Sleep





7 Steps to Success

Follow these seven steps for success using The Silent Sleep

  1. Start with your family, staff members, and their family. Let your first "patients" be the people you care about the most. They will be more forgiving of your learning curve, especially since you'll most likely treat them for free in order to gain the valuable experience. After treating 5 to 10 family and friends, then you'll be ready to help your patients.
  2. Screen EVERY person who walks in your door. Give the "Epworth/STOP BANG/Bruxism" questionnaire to all of your patients, regardless of age or why they are coming in. Even if the patient reports little on the questionnaire, still ask them follow up questions, such as:

    Click here to download the questionnaire »

    1. I see it's not likely for you to fall asleep during the day, however, do you feel fatigued? (Women are far more likely to report fatigue than sleepiness.)
    2. I see that you don't snore loudly, but do you snore at all? (Thin women who snore at all may have sleep apnea.)
    3. Are you aware of clenching or grinding your teeth at night? (This question is asked in conjunction with looking for anterior wear, mandibular tori and scalloping on the borders of the tongue.)
    4. If any of these questions elicit positive responses, a sleep study, and fitting with the Silent Sleep, may be indicated. In a typical general dental practice, 15-20% of patients will screen positive.
  3. Train your hygiene department to review the questionnaires and have the discussion about the connection between bruxism and sleep apnea with the patient. They should also be the one to present the initial idea of the Silent Sleep... letting the patient know that the dentist will make the ultimate decision if the Silent Sleep is indicated or not.
  4. Incentivize your staff. Whether it's the hygiene department, a dental assistant, or a combination of staff members who have the responsibility for screening and educating the patients about the Silent Sleep, reward them for their efforts with a 10-20% bonus based on the charge for the appliance. This will help the staff get excited about the program and keep them motivated.
  5. Learn how to titrate the appliance. Start most patients in a comfortable, slightly protruded position. For a patient with a class I or class II, division II, occlusion the starting position will typically be roughly "end to end." Explain to the patient that it will typically take a week or two for the patient to get used to wearing the appliance, and to wear it through the night. Get them back for follow up after 2 to 4 weeks. If the patient is still snoring, consider changing the position of the appliance, bringing the mandible 1 to 2mm further forward. If the patient is no longer snoring, but is experiencing jaw muscle pain (particularly in the masseters), then consider changing the position to allow the jaw to come back slightly, or consider closing the vertical. For more information on titration, browse our website.
  6. Make it about more than bruxism and snoring, and connect with your medical community. Protecting your patients' teeth, and helping them sleep better is important. However, if your patient has sleep apnea, and you help them receive the treatment that they need, you could be saving their life. INSIST that your patient talk to their family physician about their possible sleep apnea, or refer them directly to a sleep doctor. Talk to sleep doctors in your area and find one that you like and who is open to oral appliance therapy.
  7. Learn more about dental sleep medicine and use of custom oral appliances for sleep apnea, and help your patients for the rest of their lives. Inevitably, you will be referring your patients for evaluation, many of them will be diagnosed with sleep apnea, and you can help many of them with custom oral appliance therapy (which is often covered by the patient's medical insurance, and a new appliance is covered every 3 to 5 years). The sleep doctors that you start working with will also have their own patients who cannot tolerate continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Once you have gained competency in treating sleep apnea, and gained the trust and respect of the sleep doctor(s) in your community, you will start receiving referrals to help these patients too... and some of them may need a good dentist as well.